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Santo Domingo 48 Hours
Why go? The Dominican Republic’s capital is a hotbed of Caribbean culture and perfect for exploring away from the resorts lining the sun- drenched coast. The cradle of the New World, the city was used by Columbus as a springboard for discovery. Today, sipping on a rum cocktail as merengue music fills the evening air – especially during carnival in February – it’s easy to dream up your own conquest. 
What to do Zona Colonial is the historic district of Santo Domingo, enshrined by Unesco for its array of buildings and monuments. Get your bearings in Parque Colón, a vast public square where a statue of Columbus gestures towards the sky, though it was his brother, Bartholomew, who founded Santo Domingo in 1498. Behind stands the Catedral Primada de América, the oldest cathedral in the Americas, nished in 1535. Its impressive vaulted ceiling is worth the visit alone – and is perhaps the best feature since British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake looted much of the cathedral’s original bounty. Nearby is the Fortaleza Ozama, whose ancient cannon still watch over the river mouth. This infamous bastion was the starting line for Spanish adventures, and its thick walls provide a cool respite from the heat. Walk the perimeter walls and climb to the top of the tower to keep watch for any pirates, just as the conquistadors did more than 500 years ago. Further up is the former home of governor Diego Columbus, son of the famous explorer.
Where to stay elbeaterio.com is in the heart of Zona Colonial. Wrought-iron four-posters, wood-beamed ceilings and a light-filled courtyard, are perfect for those who detest fussy modern hotels, and the simple rooftop terrace bar is ideal for a sundowner. Going back to the future, Hotel Villa Colonial 00 809 221 1049, villacolonial.net is a former art deco villa with original 1920s tiled floors. The courtyard garden and pool are mini-oases, while rooms have an elegant period appeal. Dating to 1502, the five-star Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando 00 809 683 1000, hodelpanicolasdeovando.com occupies three townhouses on Calle Las Damas, including that of colonial governor Nicolás de Ovando. Contemporary bedrooms contrast with period-style spaces that have been given a modern twist. For a more eclectic casa, check in to Casa del XVI 00 855 849 6396, casasdelxvi.com with its colonial-style interiors and works by local artists, each room is a work of art in themselves.
 Where to eat and drink Chef Martin Omar serves up some of Santo Domingo’s most creative meals at Dos Mundos, housed within Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando. A la carte lunches and a nine-course tasting menu for dinner are all prepared according to what’s in season. Dishes such as coconut soup with Mediterranean sea bass or artichokes and herring marinated in Jamaican pepper are a fusion of local and European flavours. For a taste of nightlife, head to the seafront strip, Malecón, where stalls selling pulled-pork sandwiches and grilled chicken help revellers fuel up for the dancehall clubs. Bar-hopping around Zona Colonial is great fun too – look out for bars that offer all-inclusive drinks for a one-off cover charge. Inventive European cooking can be found at Pat’e Palo 00 809 519 9687 on Plaza de España, also a great spot for people-watching. Squid ink risotto or octopus with chickpea purée are devoured on the terrace overlooking the illuminated coral facade of the Alcázar de Colón. In the heart of Zona Colonial, a taste of Dominican Republic cooking is on offer at Mesón D’Bari 00 809 689 5546, set in a colourful, shabby-chic colonial home. Local dishes include Creole beef fillet with tomatoes, onions and sweet peppers, and you can join revellers in listening to a live merengue band or watching baseball on TV.
 
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Santo Domingo 48 Hours
Why go? The Dominican Republic’s capital is a hotbed of Caribbean culture and perfect for exploring away from the resorts lining the sun- drenched coast. The cradle of the New World, the city was used by Columbus as a springboard for discovery. Today, sipping on a rum cocktail as merengue music fills the evening air – especially during carnival in February – it’s easy to dream up your own conquest. 
What to do Zona Colonial is the historic district of Santo Domingo, enshrined by Unesco for its array of buildings and monuments. Get your bearings in Parque Colón, a vast public square where a statue of Columbus gestures towards the sky, though it was his brother, Bartholomew, who founded Santo Domingo in 1498. Behind stands the Catedral Primada de América, the oldest cathedral in the Americas, nished in 1535. Its impressive vaulted ceiling is worth the visit alone – and is perhaps the best feature since British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake looted much of the cathedral’s original bounty. Nearby is the Fortaleza Ozama, whose ancient cannon still watch over the river mouth. This infamous bastion was the starting line for Spanish adventures, and its thick walls provide a cool respite from the heat. Walk the perimeter walls and climb to the top of the tower to keep watch for any pirates, just as the conquistadors did more than 500 years ago. Further up is the former home of governor Diego Columbus, son of the famous explorer.
Where to stay elbeaterio.com is in the heart of Zona Colonial. Wrought-iron four-posters, wood-beamed ceilings and a light-filled courtyard, are perfect for those who detest fussy modern hotels, and the simple rooftop terrace bar is ideal for a sundowner. Going back to the future, Hotel Villa Colonial 00 809 221 1049, villacolonial.net is a former art deco villa with original 1920s tiled floors. The courtyard garden and pool are mini-oases, while rooms have an elegant period appeal. Dating to 1502, the five-star Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando 00 809 683 1000, hodelpanicolasdeovando.com occupies three townhouses on Calle Las Damas, including that of colonial governor Nicolás de Ovando. Contemporary bedrooms contrast with period-style spaces that have been given a modern twist. For a more eclectic casa, check in to Casa del XVI 00 855 849 6396, casasdelxvi.com with its colonial-style interiors and works by local artists, each room is a work of art in themselves.
 Where to eat and drink Chef Martin Omar serves up some of Santo Domingo’s most creative meals at Dos Mundos, housed within Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando. A la carte lunches and a nine-course tasting menu for dinner are all prepared according to what’s in season. Dishes such as coconut soup with Mediterranean sea bass or artichokes and herring marinated in Jamaican pepper are a fusion of local and European flavours. For a taste of nightlife, head to the seafront strip, Malecón, where stalls selling pulled-pork sandwiches and grilled chicken help revellers fuel up for the dancehall clubs. Bar-hopping around Zona Colonial is great fun too – look out for bars that offer all-inclusive drinks for a one-off cover charge. Inventive European cooking can be found at Pat’e Palo 00 809 519 9687 on Plaza de España, also a great spot for people-watching. Squid ink risotto or octopus with chickpea purée are devoured on the terrace overlooking the illuminated coral facade of the Alcázar de Colón. In the heart of Zona Colonial, a taste of Dominican Republic cooking is on offer at Mesón D’Bari 00 809 689 5546, set in a colourful, shabby-chic colonial home. Local dishes include Creole beef fillet with tomatoes, onions and sweet peppers, and you can join revellers in listening to a live merengue band or watching baseball on TV.
Our Products
Nutrition
Recipes
Santo Domingo 48 Hours
Why go? The Dominican Republic’s capital is a hotbed of Caribbean culture and perfect for exploring away from the resorts lining the sun- drenched coast. The cradle of the New World, the city was used by Columbus as a springboard for discovery. Today, sipping on a rum cocktail as merengue music fills the evening air – especially during carnival in February – it’s easy to dream up your own conquest. 
What to do Zona Colonial is the historic district of Santo Domingo, enshrined by Unesco for its array of buildings and monuments. Get your bearings in Parque Colón, a vast public square where a statue of Columbus gestures towards the sky, though it was his brother, Bartholomew, who founded Santo Domingo in 1498. Behind stands the Catedral Primada de América, the oldest cathedral in the Americas, nished in 1535. Its impressive vaulted ceiling is worth the visit alone – and is perhaps the best feature since British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake looted much of the cathedral’s original bounty. Nearby is the Fortaleza Ozama, whose ancient cannon still watch over the river mouth. This infamous bastion was the starting line for Spanish adventures, and its thick walls provide a cool respite from the heat. Walk the perimeter walls and climb to the top of the tower to keep watch for any pirates, just as the conquistadors did more than 500 years ago. Further up is the former home of governor Diego Columbus, son of the famous explorer.
Where to stay elbeaterio.com is in the heart of Zona Colonial. Wrought-iron four-posters, wood-beamed ceilings and a light-filled courtyard, are perfect for those who detest fussy modern hotels, and the simple rooftop terrace bar is ideal for a sundowner. Going back to the future, Hotel Villa Colonial 00 809 221 1049, villacolonial.net is a former art deco villa with original 1920s tiled floors. The courtyard garden and pool are mini-oases, while rooms have an elegant period appeal. Dating to 1502, the five-star Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando 00 809 683 1000, hodelpanicolasdeovando.com occupies three townhouses on Calle Las Damas, including that of colonial governor Nicolás de Ovando. Contemporary bedrooms contrast with period-style spaces that have been given a modern twist. For a more eclectic casa, check in to Casa del XVI 00 855 849 6396, casasdelxvi.com with its colonial-style interiors and works by local artists, each room is a work of art in themselves.
 Where to eat and drink Chef Martin Omar serves up some of Santo Domingo’s most creative meals at Dos Mundos, housed within Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando. A la carte lunches and a nine-course tasting menu for dinner are all prepared according to what’s in season. Dishes such as coconut soup with Mediterranean sea bass or artichokes and herring marinated in Jamaican pepper are a fusion of local and European flavours. For a taste of nightlife, head to the seafront strip, Malecón, where stalls selling pulled-pork sandwiches and grilled chicken help revellers fuel up for the dancehall clubs. Bar-hopping around Zona Colonial is great fun too – look out for bars that offer all-inclusive drinks for a one-off cover charge. Inventive European cooking can be found at Pat’e Palo 00 809 519 9687 on Plaza de España, also a great spot for people-watching. Squid ink risotto or octopus with chickpea purée are devoured on the terrace overlooking the illuminated coral facade of the Alcázar de Colón. In the heart of Zona Colonial, a taste of Dominican Republic cooking is on offer at Mesón D’Bari 00 809 689 5546, set in a colourful, shabby-chic colonial home. Local dishes include Creole beef fillet with tomatoes, onions and sweet peppers, and you can join revellers in listening to a live merengue band or watching baseball on TV. More information visit
Our Products
Nutrition
Recipes
Santo Domingo 48 Hours
Why go? The Dominican Republic’s capital is a hotbed of Caribbean culture and perfect for exploring away from the resorts lining the sun- drenched coast. The cradle of the New World, the city was used by Columbus as a springboard for discovery. Today, sipping on a rum cocktail as merengue music fills the evening air – especially during carnival in February – it’s easy to dream up your own conquest. 
What to do Zona Colonial is the historic district of Santo Domingo, enshrined by Unesco for its array of buildings and monuments. Get your bearings in Parque Colón, a vast public square where a statue of Columbus gestures towards the sky, though it was his brother, Bartholomew, who founded Santo Domingo in 1498. Behind stands the Catedral Primada de América, the oldest cathedral in the Americas, nished in 1535. Its impressive vaulted ceiling is worth the visit alone – and is perhaps the best feature since British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake looted much of the cathedral’s original bounty. Nearby is the Fortaleza Ozama, whose ancient cannon still watch over the river mouth. This infamous bastion was the starting line for Spanish adventures, and its thick walls provide a cool respite from the heat. Walk the perimeter walls and climb to the top of the tower to keep watch for any pirates, just as the conquistadors did more than 500 years ago. Further up is the former home of governor Diego Columbus, son of the famous explorer.
Where to stay elbeaterio.com is in the heart of Zona Colonial. Wrought-iron four-posters, wood-beamed ceilings and a light-filled courtyard, are perfect for those who detest fussy modern hotels, and the simple rooftop terrace bar is ideal for a sundowner. Going back to the future, Hotel Villa Colonial 00 809 221 1049, villacolonial.net is a former art deco villa with original 1920s tiled floors. The courtyard garden and pool are mini-oases, while rooms have an elegant period appeal. Dating to 1502, the five-star Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando 00 809 683 1000, hodelpanicolasdeovando.com occupies three townhouses on Calle Las Damas, including that of colonial governor Nicolás de Ovando. Contemporary bedrooms contrast with period-style spaces that have been given a modern twist. For a more eclectic casa, check in to Casa del XVI 00 855 849 6396, casasdelxvi.com with its colonial-style interiors and works by local artists, each room is a work of art in themselves.
 Where to eat and drink Chef Martin Omar serves up some of Santo Domingo’s most creative meals at Dos Mundos, housed within Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando. A la carte lunches and a nine-course tasting menu for dinner are all prepared according to what’s in season. Dishes such as coconut soup with Mediterranean sea bass or artichokes and herring marinated in Jamaican pepper are a fusion of local and European flavours. For a taste of nightlife, head to the seafront strip, Malecón, where stalls selling pulled-pork sandwiches and grilled chicken help revellers fuel up for the dancehall clubs. Bar-hopping around Zona Colonial is great fun too – look out for bars that offer all-inclusive drinks for a one-off cover charge. Inventive European cooking can be found at Pat’e Palo 00 809 519 9687 on Plaza de España, also a great spot for people-watching. Squid ink risotto or octopus with chickpea purée are devoured on the terrace overlooking the illuminated coral facade of the Alcázar de Colón. In the heart of Zona Colonial, a taste of Dominican Republic cooking is on offer at Mesón D’Bari 00 809 689 5546, set in a colourful, shabby-chic colonial home. Local dishes include Creole beef fillet with tomatoes, onions and sweet peppers, and you can join revellers in listening to a live merengue band or watching baseball on TV.
Our Products
Nutrition
Recipes
Santo Domingo 48 Hours
Why go? The Dominican Republic’s capital is a hotbed of Caribbean culture and perfect for exploring away from the resorts lining the sun- drenched coast. The cradle of the New World, the city was used by Columbus as a springboard for discovery. Today, sipping on a rum cocktail as merengue music fills the evening air – especially during carnival in February – it’s easy to dream up your own conquest. 
What to do Zona Colonial is the historic district of Santo Domingo, enshrined by Unesco for its array of buildings and monuments. Get your bearings in Parque Colón, a vast public square where a statue of Columbus gestures towards the sky, though it was his brother, Bartholomew, who founded Santo Domingo in 1498. Behind stands the Catedral Primada de América, the oldest cathedral in the Americas, nished in 1535. Its impressive vaulted ceiling is worth the visit alone – and is perhaps the best feature since British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake looted much of the cathedral’s original bounty. Nearby is the Fortaleza Ozama, whose ancient cannon still watch over the river mouth. This infamous bastion was the starting line for Spanish adventures, and its thick walls provide a cool respite from the heat. Walk the perimeter walls and climb to the top of the tower to keep watch for any pirates, just as the conquistadors did more than 500 years ago. Further up is the former home of governor Diego Columbus, son of the famous explorer.
Where to stay elbeaterio.com is in the heart of Zona Colonial. Wrought-iron four-posters, wood-beamed ceilings and a light-filled courtyard, are perfect for those who detest fussy modern hotels, and the simple rooftop terrace bar is ideal for a sundowner. Going back to the future, Hotel Villa Colonial 00 809 221 1049, villacolonial.net is a former art deco villa with original 1920s tiled floors. The courtyard garden and pool are mini-oases, while rooms have an elegant period appeal. Dating to 1502, the five-star Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando 00 809 683 1000, hodelpanicolasdeovando.com occupies three townhouses on Calle Las Damas, including that of colonial governor Nicolás de Ovando. Contemporary bedrooms contrast with period-style spaces that have been given a modern twist. For a more eclectic casa, check in to Casa del XVI 00 855 849 6396, casasdelxvi.com with its colonial-style interiors and works by local artists, each room is a work of art in themselves.
 Where to eat and drink Chef Martin Omar serves up some of Santo Domingo’s most creative meals at Dos Mundos, housed within Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando. A la carte lunches and a nine-course tasting menu for dinner are all prepared according to what’s in season. Dishes such as coconut soup with Mediterranean sea bass or artichokes and herring marinated in Jamaican pepper are a fusion of local and European flavours. For a taste of nightlife, head to the seafront strip, Malecón, where stalls selling pulled-pork sandwiches and grilled chicken help revellers fuel up for the dancehall clubs. Bar-hopping around Zona Colonial is great fun too – look out for bars that offer all-inclusive drinks for a one-off cover charge. Inventive European cooking can be found at Pat’e Palo 00 809 519 9687 on Plaza de España, also a great spot for people-watching. Squid ink risotto or octopus with chickpea purée are devoured on the terrace overlooking the illuminated coral facade of the Alcázar de Colón. In the heart of Zona Colonial, a taste of Dominican Republic cooking is on offer at Mesón D’Bari 00 809 689 5546, set in a colourful, shabby-chic colonial home. Local dishes include Creole beef fillet with tomatoes, onions and sweet peppers, and you can join revellers in listening to a live merengue band or watching baseball on TV.
Our Products
Nutrition
Recipes
Santo Domingo 48 Hours
Why go? The Dominican Republic’s capital is a hotbed of Caribbean culture and perfect for exploring away from the resorts lining the sun- drenched coast. The cradle of the New World, the city was used by Columbus as a springboard for discovery. Today, sipping on a rum cocktail as merengue music fills the evening air – especially during carnival in February – it’s easy to dream up your own conquest. 
What to do Zona Colonial is the historic district of Santo Domingo, enshrined by Unesco for its array of buildings and monuments. Get your bearings in Parque Colón, a vast public square where a statue of Columbus gestures towards the sky, though it was his brother, Bartholomew, who founded Santo Domingo in 1498. Behind stands the Catedral Primada de América, the oldest cathedral in the Americas, nished in 1535. Its impressive vaulted ceiling is worth the visit alone – and is perhaps the best feature since British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake looted much of the cathedral’s original bounty. Nearby is the Fortaleza Ozama, whose ancient cannon still watch over the river mouth. This infamous bastion was the starting line for Spanish adventures, and its thick walls provide a cool respite from the heat. Walk the perimeter walls and climb to the top of the tower to keep watch for any pirates, just as the conquistadors did more than 500 years ago. Further up is the former home of governor Diego Columbus, son of the famous explorer.
Where to stay elbeaterio.com is in the heart of Zona Colonial. Wrought-iron four-posters, wood-beamed ceilings and a light-filled courtyard, are perfect for those who detest fussy modern hotels, and the simple rooftop terrace bar is ideal for a sundowner. Going back to the future, Hotel Villa Colonial 00 809 221 1049, villacolonial.net is a former art deco villa with original 1920s tiled floors. The courtyard garden and pool are mini-oases, while rooms have an elegant period appeal. Dating to 1502, the five-star Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando 00 809 683 1000, hodelpanicolasdeovando.com occupies three townhouses on Calle Las Damas, including that of colonial governor Nicolás de Ovando. Contemporary bedrooms contrast with period-style spaces that have been given a modern twist. For a more eclectic casa, check in to Casa del XVI 00 855 849 6396, casasdelxvi.com with its colonial-style interiors and works by local artists, each room is a work of art in themselves.
 Where to eat and drink Chef Martin Omar serves up some of Santo Domingo’s most creative meals at Dos Mundos, housed within Hodelpa Nicolás de Ovando. A la carte lunches and a nine-course tasting menu for dinner are all prepared according to what’s in season. Dishes such as coconut soup with Mediterranean sea bass or artichokes and herring marinated in Jamaican pepper are a fusion of local and European flavours. For a taste of nightlife, head to the seafront strip, Malecón, where stalls selling pulled-pork sandwiches and grilled chicken help revellers fuel up for the dancehall clubs. Bar-hopping around Zona Colonial is great fun too – look out for bars that offer all-inclusive drinks for a one-off cover charge. Inventive European cooking can be found at Pat’e Palo 00 809 519 9687 on Plaza de España, also a great spot for people-watching. Squid ink risotto or octopus with chickpea purée are devoured on the terrace overlooking the illuminated coral facade of the Alcázar de Colón. In the heart of Zona Colonial, a taste of Dominican Republic cooking is on offer at Mesón D’Bari 00 809 689 5546, set in a colourful, shabby-chic colonial home. Local dishes include Creole beef fillet with tomatoes, onions and sweet peppers, and you can join revellers in listening to a live merengue band or watching baseball on TV.
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Nutrition
Recipes